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Many Software’s exist in the market. But they all work in isolation and cater to only a part of the health care eco-system.

DOCSMART is a novel health care software which addresses this lacunae and helps in linking all health care services under a Common cloud based Health care Ecosystem (HES).

Various Modules for health care Providers are created which talk among themselves in real time without any external interference, maintaining a secure and confidential environment.

Unlike many existing software’s the Search Module for Providers is offered free so that genuine information is shared with the patients. The App allows for genuine Rating and Reviews along with features towards online Chat and Grievance redressal among others. All modules for the Providers are comprehensively made to include Appointments, Staff, Stock and Accounting features among others.

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DocSmart Offers a gamut of Home Healthcare Provider Services. A platform for all stake holders to interact among themselves.

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All the needs of a doctor in the form of Visibility, Appointment Booking, Out Patient Module, In Patient online Hospital records Access, Online Consultation, Telemedicine, Conferences, Online Meetings, Webinars, News-Blogs-Forums and Emergency Codes form part of this software. The doctor can access health records in real time.

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DocSmart brings to you all medical updates happening globally. Stay Tuned!!

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BA.5 Omicron infections rising in India: Health Ministry official

11th August 2022

New Delhi , August 9 The BA.5 variant of Omicron, dominant across the world, is increasing in India too; and contributing to nearly 20 – 30 per cent of the fresh cases being reported. The surge in BA.5 variants comes even as parts of the country, like Delhi, is witnessing a spike in Covid-19 positivity. There, however, has been no decision on mixing of vaccines (for the booster shot), a senior official of the Union Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, told BusinessLine.

According to the official, BA.5 variants were around 10-15 percent of the total reported Covid cases some two-to-three weeks back in India. However, at present, there has been a 2x to 3x increase in the number.

The spike, however, is “less worrying” as there has been “no clusters” of infection being reported from anywhere in the country.

“As of now, BA.2 variants continue to be the dominant strain accounting for 70 -80 per cent of the total Covid cases. These will include sub lineages such as 2.38, 2.73, 2.74 and 2.75. However, BA.5 cases are now increasing. They are almost double of what they were some 14-21 days back. This too is seen as a cause of breakthrough infections,” the official said.

Genome sequencing data is yet to throw up any “variant of concern”. The Insacog will meet on Friday to take up discussions on Covid data and decide on future course of action, if required.

“Unlike Western countries, there are no reports of any clustering caused due to BA.5,” the official said.

The BA.5 variant has three key mutations in its spike protein which enables greater chances of infection and ability to slip past immune defences. In just over two months, BA.5 emerged the dominant cause of Covid-19 in the United States. Last week, this subvariant caused almost two out of every three new Covid-19 infections in the US, according to CDC data.

In India, the latest Insacog report said, Omicron and its sub-lineages continue to be the dominant variant. Omicron sub-lineages BA.2 and BA.2.38 have mostly been found and “some BA.2.75 has been identified”. However, any surge in hospitalisation or any disease severity has not been observed.

Mixing boosters

According to the official, the Centre is yet to take a call on mixing of vaccines.

Biological E’s protein subunit Corbevax (Covid-19 vaccine) was the first to be approved by the country’s drug regulator or DGCI as a heterologous booster in adults, meaning those who have received Covishield or Covaxin as their first or second dose can take it as a third booster shot.

“The Centre has to take a call and it's pending,” he said.

Covid cases in Delhi

Meanwhile, Delhi reported 1,372 fresh Covid cases and six deaths (on August 7) with the positivity rate shooting up to 17.85 per cent - the highest since January 2021. The bulletin said 7,686 Covid-19 tests were carried out in the national capital.

India reported 12,751 fresh infections in the last 24 hours, taking the total number of infections to 4.41 crore, as per data released by the Ministry. There were 42 deaths, which include 10-backlog cases from Kerala. There were six deaths reported from Delhi, five from West Bengal, and four from Maharashtra.

India’s active caseload currently stands at 0.31 per cent of the total cases. It also declined by 3,703 on a 24-hour basis. The country’s recovery rate is currently at 98.50 per cent.



This article is republished from
Hindu Business Line under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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The government has approved Biological E's Corbevax as a precaution dose for those above 18 years fully vaccinated with either Covishield or Covaxin, official sources said on Wednesday. This is for the first time that a booster dose that is different from the one used for primary vaccination against Covid has been allowed in the country. The sources told PTI that the Union Health Ministry's approval is based on the recommendations made recently by the COVID-19 Working Group of the National Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (NTAGI). "Corbevax will be considered as a precaution dose after completion of six months or 26 weeks from the date of administration of the second dose of either Covaxin or Covishield vaccines for those aged above 18 years enabling use of Corbevax as a heterologous COVID-19 vaccine for precaution dose administration in this age group," the sources said. This will be in addition to the existing guidelines for homologous precaution dose administration of Covaxin and Covishield vaccine, the sources added. All necessary changes in regard to the administration of precaution dose of Corbevax vaccine are being made on the Co-WIN portal. India's first indigenously developed RBD protein subunit vaccine Corbevax is currently being used to inoculate children in the age group of 12 to 14 years under the COVID-19 immunisation programme. The COVID-19 Working Group (CWG), in its July 20 meeting, reviewed data of the double-blind randomised phase-3 clinical study which evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of booster dose of Corbevax vaccine when administered to COVID-19-negative adult volunteers of age 18-80 years previously vaccinated with two doses of either Covishield or Covaxin. ' "Following the examination of the data, the CWG observed that Corbevax vaccine can induce significant increase in antibody titers when given to those who have received either Covaxin or Covishield, which is likely to be protective as per the neutralisation data also," the sources said. The Drugs Controller General of India (DCGI) on June 4 approved Corbevax as a precaution for those aged 18 and above. India began administering precaution doses of vaccines to healthcare and frontline workers and those aged 60 and above with comorbidities from January 10. The country began inoculating children aged 12-14 from March 16 and also removed the comorbidity clause making all people aged above 60 eligible for the precaution dose of Covid vaccine. India on April 10 began administering precaution doses of COVID-19 vaccines to all aged above 18 years. This article is republished from Business Standard under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

11th August 2022

The government has approved Biological E's Corbevax as a precaution dose for those above 18 years fully vaccinated with either Covishield or Covaxin, official sources said on Wednesday.

This is for the first time that a booster dose that is different from the one used for primary vaccination against Covid has been allowed in the country.

The sources told PTI that the Union Health Ministry's approval is based on the recommendations made recently by the COVID-19 Working Group of the National Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (NTAGI).

"Corbevax will be considered as a precaution dose after completion of six months or 26 weeks from the date of administration of the second dose of either Covaxin or Covishield vaccines for those aged above 18 years enabling use of

Corbevax as a heterologous COVID-19 vaccine for precaution dose administration in this age group," the sources said.

This will be in addition to the existing guidelines for homologous precaution dose administration of Covaxin and Covishield vaccine, the sources added.

All necessary changes in regard to the administration of precaution dose of Corbevax vaccine are being made on the Co-WIN portal.

India's first indigenously developed RBD protein subunit vaccine Corbevax is currently being used to inoculate children in the age group of 12 to 14 years under the COVID-19 immunisation programme.

The COVID-19 Working Group (CWG), in its July 20 meeting, reviewed data of the double-blind randomised phase-3 clinical study which evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of booster dose of Corbevax vaccine when administered to COVID-19-negative adult volunteers of age 18-80 years previously vaccinated with two doses of either Covishield or Covaxin. '

Following the examination of the data, the CWG observed that Corbevax vaccine can induce significant increase in antibody titers when given to those who have received either Covaxin or Covishield, which is likely to be protective as per the neutralisation data also," the sources said.

The Drugs Controller General of India (DCGI) on June 4 approved Corbevax as a precaution for those aged 18 and above.

India began administering precaution doses of vaccines to healthcare and frontline workers and those aged 60 and above with comorbidities from January 10.

The country began inoculating children aged 12-14 from March 16 and also removed the comorbidity clause making all people aged above 60 eligible for the precaution dose of Covid vaccine.

India on April 10 began administering precaution doses of COVID-19 vaccines to all aged above 18 years.


This article is republished from
Business Standard under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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Calcium and Potassium-Rich Diets Prevent Kidney Stones Recurrence

11th August 2022

The kidneys, two bean-shaped structures located in the paravertebral gutters, are our major excretory organs. They are responsible for maintaining a stable internal environment of the body, by engaging in some important processes including ultra-filtration, excretion, osmoregulation, and maintenance of acid-base balance. A common problem associated with these important organs is kidney stones.

Kidney stones are solid masses or crystals of minerals and salts that buildup within the kidneys over time. They occur as a result of the urine being too concentrated in such a way that leads to the crystallization of minerals present in it. These stones can block the ureters, thereby, obstructing the flow of urine. This causes the kidneys to become swollen, and urination to be painful.

If a person experiences a kidney stone once, there is a 30% possibility of recurrence within another five years. To prevent this, doctors often advise a change in diet. However, doctors are still unsure of the best choice of diet intake for a patient who has one incident of kidney stone as opposed to those who have recurrent incidents. Studies have been ongoing to uncover this, and thanks to the team of researchers at Mayo Clinic, there seems to be an answer to it now.

Best choice of diet to reduce kidney stone recurrence rate

Doctors have always recommended dietary changes based on factors linked to the first-time kidney stone occurrence rather than a recurrent case, thereby, the high chances of recurrence. The team discovered this by administering a questionnaire to 411 patients who had kidney stones for the first time, and to another group of 384 people – the control group – who visited the Mayo Clinic in Rochester and Florida between 2009 and 2018. They were able to discover that diets low in calcium and potassium, fluids, caffeine, and phytate, are linked to the occurrence of a first-time kidney stone disease: low fluid intake of less than 3,400ml (about nine 12-ounce glasses) of fluid per day; low caffeine intake which leads to a low volume of urine, that is highly concentrated; low intake of phytate, an antioxidant present in whole grains and nuts responsible for more calcium absorption and urinary calcium excretion.

73 out of the patients that experienced recurrent kidney stones did so within an average of 4.1 years of follow-up. On further research, they discovered that diets that are low in calcium and potassium contributed big time to recurrent stones and that this is the major factor that facilitates recurrence.

At the end of the study, they concluded that a daily intake of a diet that contains about 1,200mg of calcium might not only help prevent first-time kidney stones but recurrent stones as well. In addition, they did not recommend that potassium be taken daily as with calcium, though, a higher level of potassium intake is recommended too.

Clinical significance

With this finding, doctors can now be sure of diet recommendations to prevent the recurrence of kidney stones in people who have experienced them once. Fruits and vegetables with high calcium and potassium contents should be added to their diets. Some potassium-rich fruits are bananas, oranges, melons, and apricots; potassium-rich veggies include mushrooms, potatoes, peas, and cucumbers.

Conclusion

Identifying the cause of the problem is always the first step to finding a solution. In this study, the team of researchers at Mayo Clinic uncovered the key factor behind kidney stone recurrence, and this discovery would go a long way to help prevent it. This study has also made a way for newer and better innovations that can help prevent even first-time kidney stones, to develop in the future.

This article is republished from Gilmore Health under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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Public healthcare, medical research lagging

11th August 2022

When we attained freedom from British rule, the path ahead was beset with challenges. Poverty, illiteracy and malnutrition were rampant. Life expectancy was a mere 32 years. Today, as we celebrate 75 years of Independence, we must take stock of our present and plan for the future.

Early on, the importance of public funding for healthcare was realised by policy-makers. The Health Survey and Development Committee had been set up in 1943 under the chairmanship of Sir Joseph Bhore. It submitted a voluminous report in 1946, which has constituted the blueprint for our public healthcare model. A three-tier architecture was created, comprising the Primary Health Centres (PHCs), Community Health Centres (CHCs) and District Hospitals (DHs). These institutions continue to constitute the backbone of the public healthcare system in India. A few years ago, the concept of mohalla clinics was introduced in Delhi and with time we will learn of the efficacy of this experiment.

The number of these healthcare centres has increased substantially, but we have been unable to keep pace with the exponential rise in our population. Problems of disparity in access and an urban bias persist.

Though guidelines (IPHS or Indian Public Health Standards) have been formulated under the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) prescribing the number of doctors/specialists in PHCs, CHCs and DHs, the quality of these facilities varies from state to state, depending upon the vision of the leadership. The Covid pandemic exposed the inadequacy of these institutions. An urgent intervention to improve the situation on the ground is necessary.

Since the early 1990s, the private sector has played an increasingly important role in healthcare. Nursing homes and private hospitals have mushroomed. The emergence of private healthcare facilities even led to India emerging as a destination for ‘medical tourism’.

Unfortunately, the rise of the private sector has coincided with a decline in standards in the government institutions. It must not be forgotten that private healthcare is expensive and practically unaffordable for many. Estimates reveal that nearly three million people fall below the poverty line each year owing to expenditure on sickness. Medical insurance is hardly ubiquitous. In these circumstances, the importance of public healthcare facilities cannot be overstated.

Notably, the Government of India initiated the Ayushman Bharat Yojana in 2018, which is a salutary measure. The scheme covers secondary- and tertiary-care hospitalisation up to Rs 5 lakh annually. It is expected that nearly 40 per cent of our population will benefit. One can say from experience that the success of this venture will depend on a very robust system of execution and monitoring. It is heartening that initial assessments show a significant positive impact.

Another vital facet is medical education. Medical colleges equip and train successive generations of professionals, including doctors and nurses. Government institutions like the AIIMS and the PGIMER, Chandigarh, have been at the forefront of this endeavour. Medical education has attracted private investment too. However, private colleges were plagued with problems like shoddy standards, improper admission procedures and capitation fees.

An attempt was made to clean up the admission system through the introduction of the NEET entrance exam. This reformatory step has met with substantial success in terms of curbing the ills of tainted admissions. While issues of a rural-urban divide have been raised in relation to performance in the NEET exam, the problem can be addressed. A possible solution is to have a hybrid model for admission to medical colleges, giving weightage to performance in the state/central board examination in addition to the NEET score.

We now have nearly 90,000 undergraduate seats every year. The focus should also be on elevating the standards of education and training. Lack of good teachers and adequate infrastructure in medical colleges must be addressed.

It would be a mistake to hastily increase the number of colleges/seats at the cost of quality infrastructure and faculty. It is ironic that many PG and super-specialty seats are lying vacant and do not attract deserving students/residents. Even medicine as a career is no more a priority profession in India among the bright youngsters. It is a serious concern and we must strive and take steps to ensure that the medical profession attracts and retains our brightest young minds, for we can ill afford mediocrity in healthcare.

Medical research and biomedical innovation are the other areas of concern. India’s pharmaceutical industry has thrived, having grown to become the third largest in the world. India is the largest exporter of generic medicines across the globe.

However, research has lagged behind. We have been unable to foster an ethos of creative ideation and research. Infrastructural bottlenecks, such as the absence of large animal experimental facilities, have compounded the problem. Animal experimental data is a requirement for human trials of any drug or biomedical device. In the absence of any national facility, the researchers and industry have to go abroad, incurring a huge cost on getting this data before any human trial.

The Atmanirbhar Bharat and ‘Make in India’ paradigms should be tailored and applied to medical care and research. Pioneering research and innovation are essential for raising healthcare standards while reducing costs.

Despite the difficulties, I remain sanguine. We are capable of building a world-class healthcare system which is accessible to all — rich or poor, rural or urban. We must recognise healthcare as a basic human right and formulate sensible policy priorities accordingly.

We will do well to remind ourselves of the words of the country’s first Prime Minster from his famous ‘Tryst with Destiny’ speech. Referring to Mahatma Gandhi, the Father of the Nation, he said: “The ambition of the greatest man of our generation has been to wipe every tear from every eye. That may be beyond us, but so long as there are tears and suffering, so long our work will not be over. And so we have to labour and to work, and work hard, to give reality to our dreams. Those dreams are for India, but they are also for the world.”

Let us pledge to redouble our efforts to fulfilling Gandhi’s dream of wiping every tear from every eye. In the healthcare realm, India can become a beacon for the world.

This article is republished from Tribune India under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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Coming Soon

Every version will surprise you with its new features. So keep abreast as DocSmart unfolds itself over the next 6 to 8 months. New versions will be added and present one upgraded with time.

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Events

Medical Events and Camps can be planned and propagated among target members. Members can search for upcoming events of their interest.

News

Medical News, Blogs, Pages will allow interaction in the app among its various members.

Frequently asked questions

We've got you covered by answering some frequently asked questions to help you out!!!

Which speciality doctors can use this?

The app can be used by doctors of all specialities.

Do I need to have a clinic?

No. You may not have a clinic and choose to work from home.

How will patients search for me?

Patients can search for doctors through the doctors search. It has search filters such as near me , rating and cost.

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